Fundamental and individual limitations in the perception of 3D motion: Implications for Virtual Reality

Bas Rokers

Bas Rokers

(University of Wisconsin- Madison)


Please LOG IN to view the video.

Date: March 23, 2016

Description:

Neuroscientists have extensively studied motion and depth perception, and have provided a good understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms. However, since these mechanisms are frequently studied in isolation, their interplay remains poorly understood. In fact, I will introduce a number of puzzling deficits in the perception of 3D motion in this talk. Given the advent of virtual reality (VR) and the need to provide a compelling user experience, it is imperative that we understand the factors that determine the sensitivity and limitations of 3D motion perception.
I will present recent work from our lab which shows that fundamental as well as individual limitations in the processing of retinal information cause specific deficits in the perception of 3D motion. Subsequently, I will discuss the potential of extra-retinal (head motion) information to overcome some of these limitations. Finally, I will discuss how individual variability in the sensitivity to 3D motion predicts the propensity for simulator sickness.
Our research sheds light on the interplay of the neural mechanisms that underlie perception, and accounts for the visual system’s sensitivity to 3D motion. Our results provide specific suggestions to improve VR technology and bring virtual reality into the mainstream

Further Information:

Bas Rokers is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and a member of the McPherson Eye Research Institute at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. His work in visual perception aims to uncover the neural basis of binocular perception, visual disorders and brain development. In 2015 he was a Visiting Professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT, and he can currently be seen in the National Geographic television series Brain Games on Netflix.

 

More Information: http://vision.psych.wisc.edu/




Created: Friday, March 25th, 2016